Saturday, February 18, 2017

Two More North Carolina Stores Have Ozarklake Feeders

We shipped out orders this week to two stores in North Carolina. How exciting! Both are in summer "tourist" areas and both are near a lake. Gee. Sounds like home here at the Lake of the Ozarks.

A Bird's Eye View in Littleton, NC, had just gotten their order unpacked when a customer walked in and purchased one! The store owner was so excited that she called to tell us about it. Blue Heron Gallery in Sunset Beach, NC, will have their order delivered early next week. We hope they have the same type of response!

These two NC locations join Tar Heel Trading Company in Corolla & Duck, Stewart's Village Gallery in Waxhaw, and When Pigz Fly in Raleigh. So if you're in North Carolina, Ozarklake feeders can be found in all corners of the state!

Hummingbird fact for today: Hummingbirds can fly in the rain and, like dogs, shake their heads to dispel drops of water. Unlike dogs, however, a hummingbird shakes its head violently, 132 times per second, and rotating 202 degrees—all while flying and maintaining direction.

Saturday, February 11, 2017

Is Winter Over Early?

It is unseasonably warm here. In fact, we pruned the butterfly bushes yesterday in shorts! Just wish that the hummingbird migration depended on weather and not on other factors (like Mother Nature and length of daylight hours, etc.). BUT they should start showing up in about 8 weeks!!!

We're working out our spring show schedule. Hopefully we'll be going to Huntington, WV, and Greenville, SC, after our March trip to Ft. Smith, AR. In July we'll head back to the Sedona Hummingbird Festival, this year by way of Portland, OR, site of the International Master Gardeners Conference this year.

We're VERY EXCITED that Ozarklake feeders are now available in the Visitors Center at Coronado National Memorial! In this very southern area of Arizona, hummingbirds of many species are in residence year-round! The Visitors Center is south of Sierra Vista and west of Bisbee, an area we visited last summer. https://www.nps.gov/coro/index.htm.

We have always recommended that people mix their own nectar from cane sugar and tap water, but we understand that sometimes the convenience of a pre-packaged nectar is needed. We have researched a lot of the nectars on the market and have concluded that the ONLY pre-packaged nectar we recommend using is EZNectar, available at Amazon, in many Wal-Mart stores, and at www.eznectar.com. This nectar is all natural with NO additives. Just sugar and water. So when you want the convenience of pre-packaged nectar, stock up on EZNectar!

Hummingbird fact for today: Hummingbirds have been part of our culture for centuries. The Aztecs have noted them in their talisman, and they were beloved and admired for their energy. Warriors believed that if they were true to battle but lost their lives, they would come back as a hummingbird. 

Friday, September 30, 2016

Summertime Fun is at an End




It seems that most all of our tiny visitors have moved on southward. We might catch a brief glimpse of one at a feeder 2 or 3 times a day, but for the most part they are gone. We had terrific summer traffic, though. The hummingbird bander was here in July, in August, and a surprise visit in September. All together, she banded 26 birds on our porch. It is awesome to know that we have contributed something, no matter how small, to the scientific study of these amazing creatures.

A couple of weeks ago when she came over, she banded 13 birds in just about 2 hours! For the previous visits, we've been neighborly and invited our neighbors over to observe the process. This last time we didn't tell anyone and Terrie was the scribe, recording the information that Veronica got from the measuring and weighing.

We're off to the Northwest Arkansas Arts and Crafts Festival in Springdale in a couple of weeks. Then we'll have our first experience at the Nashville Christmas Village in November. We cut back on our show participation this year. With any luck, the wholesale accounts we've picked up will be steady customers.

Hummingbird fact for today: The instinct to migrate is so strong that nothing short of captivity can keep a healthy, normal migratory bird from going south. The few hummingbirds that try to winter in climates too cold for their survival most likely are physically unfit to migrate or have off-kilter internal compasses and would have died sooner had they not found feeders. By leaving a feeder up through the full migration period, you may give a disadvantaged bird a second chance at survival.


Monday, August 22, 2016

Not Getting Much Done

Who wants to work when the hummer activity is up? Besides, Bill is still "recovering" from last week's cataract surgery. So we sit and watch hummers getting fat in preparation for their migration. And the hummingbird bander is coming back this evening :-)

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Hummingbird fact for today: Each species of hummingbird makes a different humming sound, determined by the number of wing beats per second.

Friday, August 12, 2016

It's Fattening Up Time!

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We had a great time at the Hummingbird Festival in Sedona, followed by the Southwest Wings Birding Festival in Sierra Vista, AZ. It's always great to see old friends and repeat customers. Plus we had some quality sight-seeing in-between shows. And lucky for us, we have a wonderful neighbor who took care of our hummers and orioles while we were away. Most of the orioles have already departed, but the hummers are fattening up for their journey south and the feeder activity is positively crazy!

Until we need to gear up for our holiday-shopping shows in Arkansas, Tennessee, and Missouri, we'll take care of personal business and enjoy our hummers until they leave. Hopefully the bander will get back while we still have a ton of hummers!!!

Hummingbird fact for today: Most ruby-throated hummingbirds winter between southern Mexico and northern Panama. Since hummingbirds lead solitary lives and neither live nor migrate in flocks, an individual bird may spend the winter anywhere in this range where the habitat is favorable, but probably returns to the same location each winter.

Monday, July 25, 2016

LOTS of Hummers Here!

We were thrilled last week to have Veronica Mecko from the Missouri River Bird Observatory spend a couple of hours on our porch banding hummingbirds. She banded 7 in just a couple of hours, with the largest weighing in at 4 grams! We set one of her two mesh traps on an Ozarklake feeder and one on one of those ugly imported feeders. We're happy to report that all 7 of the birds were caught on the Ozarklake feeder!





Getting ready to head to Sedona for the Hummingbird Festival and then Southwest Wings Summer Birding Festival in Sierra Vista. So we're switching from our feeders (Ozarklake feeders) to the imported kind for the convenience of our birdsitter on a rainy day. They don't seem to be having any trouble adapting. And there's a couple more feeders on the back deck just as active as these. We're leaving 50 lbs. of sugar for and hope it is enough to last until we get home (2 weeks).

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Hummingbird fact for today: The ruby-throated hummingbird has only approximately 940 feathers on its entire body.

Sunday, July 3, 2016

Rain or Increased Population?

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We're not sure if it is the cooler, rainy weather or if baby hummers have now fledged, but the activity has been like this for hours. And there are 4 more feeders that are not in the BirdCam's field of view. This is so much fun! And nearly a full-time job keeping up with making nectar and filling feeders.

We've been busy with wholesale orders. New shipments have gone out to the South Padre Island Birding and Nature Center in Texas, the Owl House in Michigan, and Beech Branch Gallery in Tennessee. If you're in the area, stop in and say howdy!

Getting ready for the Hummingbird Festival in Sedona, AZ, and Southwest Wings in Sierra Vista, AZ. We always see a lot of old friends in Sedona, and we're looking forward to our first visit in Sierra Vista. Not to mention that we're more than ready for a road trip!

Hummingbird fact for today: Basically, it is illegal in the United States to hold a hummingbird, a hummingbird nest, a hummingbird baby, or any part of a hummingbird, nest, or egg, in any type of captivity in any way, shape, or form. This means that unless you have a valid permit, it is illegal to trap, band, hold, harass, or control any hummingbird or any part of the hummingbird, nest, or egg.